You’re Finally Here

You'reFinallyHereOur Bunny speaks to us about our tardiness in having taken so long to come to visit him in the book.  He even wants us to sign a contract about staying there.  But, he gets so involved in a phone call that he ignores us, and, in the end, we leave.

Melanie Watt, Kids Can Press, ©2011, 9978-1-55453-590-3

Using the Character

The character is drawn in many simple poses in the book. Scan or trace them onto a single sheet of paper and then make copies for students creating their own version of the rabbit story.

The pattern of this book is easy to imitate. In the center of the book the rabbit is complaining:

  • . . .”how long I’ve been waiting in here?” Long enough to . . . (4 times)
  • . . .”how unfair it is to keep me waiting?” As unfair as . . . (4 things)
  • . . .”how rude is it to make me wait?” As rude as . . . (4 things)

This could be a springboard for any character complaining about something.  Imagine it is a rabbit who is unhappy with his school lunch.

How many weeks have I had the same lunch?

  • since Christmas
  • since my birthday
  • since I accidentally said I liked bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwiches, etc.

How much don’t I like lettuce?

  • as little as I like liver
  • as little as fried jelly beans, etc.

How long does it take me to eat it?

  • until all the other kids are already finished the first inning of baseball
  • until my teeth wear out from chewing, etc.

Personal Writing (Extreme Writing)

Some possible personal writing topics are:

  • times I have to wait and what I am thinking
  • times that are really boring
  • times that I was treated unfairly

For 9 creative writing ideas, click You’re Finally Here to download.

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Such a Prince

such-prince-dan-bar-el-book-cover-artMarvin, is small, skinny, and in competition for the princess with several rude suitors. With the assistance of an an unusual fairy he succeeds in presenting the princess with the three perfect peaches she needs. Unfortunately, rather than giving him his daughter, the kind presents him with challenges including fattening 100 rabbits without losing any of them. Of course he succeeds, with a little magic. An adaptation of a French fairy tale.

Dan Bar-el, Houghton Mifflin, ©2007, 13:978-0-618-71468-1

Once Upon a Time Magazine

The cover features many of the elements of a magazine at the supermarket, trying to tempt you to read what is inside the magazine. “Local Fairy Tells All”, “Exclusive Story!”, “Shocking Pictures”, “Happy Ending Inside!”, and “Will He Win Princess Vera’s Heart?” are all from the cover of Such a Prince.

Bring some magazines into class such as: US, People, Star, National Enquirer, etc. Discuss how the headlines and catchlines try to sell the magazine to a customer who is waiting at checkout. Which headlines draw them the most? Would that be the same for their parents? For their next piece of writing, ask students to create a simple magazine-style cover featuring those kinds of elements to draw people into their piece.

Listening Skill

As you read, ask students to make a list of what the fairy tells us are her qualities. She mentions that she is a people person, naturally curious, likes to stay active and busy, and isn’t flashy.

For 5 creative writing ideas, click Such a Prince, to download.

Mr Maxwell’s Mouse

maxwellmouseAt the Paw and Claw restaurant it is lunch and Mr. Maxwell wants to celebrate his promotion with something special. He orders the headwaiter, Clyde to bring him a live mouse instead. When Clyde asks “Would you like us to kill it for you?” Mr. Maxwell replies, “That won’t be necessary.”

But his decision results in a mouse with excellent manners slowly undermining his desire to kill it. The mouse speaks for one thing, has excellent manners, suggests salt and pepper, requests that grace be said, suggests and appropriate wine, and so on.

How the mouse gets out of it is very reminiscent of other “escape” stories including the fairy tale Three Billy Goats Gruff.

Frank and Devin Asch, Kids Can Press, 2004, ISBN 978-1-55337486-2

Food Advice From Your Parents

Mr. Maxwell’s mother had always said, “Don’t fraternize with your food.” Use this as a starting point to a discussion of advice, rules, and sayings about food that the students have from their parents. Ask them to brainstorm at least six sayings and be prepared to present the logic behind the sayings.

  • Don’t play with your food
  • Don’t chew with your mouth open
  • Eat everything on your plate
  • Just try it
  • Don’t bit off more than you can chew
  • As easy as apple pie
  • It’s a piece of cake
  • It’s like taking candy from a baby
  • It’s good for you
  • A dish fit for a king
  • As alike as two peas in a pod
  • A watched pot never boils
  • Man does not live by bread alone
  • Take that with a pinch of salt
  • You are what you eat

A story where one character persistently offers “food” sayings and advice to the other character might be fun if students are enjoying this activity. (Perhaps a frog that is trying rather unsuccessfully to catch flies while his little friend is continually offering advice.)

The Note of Apology

At the end of the book the mouse sends a note of apology to Mr. Maxwell. Analyze it with the students to identify its characteristics, before they practice an imaginary apology themselves. It might be fun for them to write a story that is actually an extended apology for a whole series of mishaps.

Characteristics students might identify could include:

  • It must be sincerely felt and must include the words “I am sorry” or “I apologize.”
  • The apology cannot be followed by the word “but…”
  • It should be short (but not if it is actually a disguise for a story).
  • It should identify the thing(s) that happened and what you are apologizing for.
  • It should offer to make up for it in some way, if possible.
  • It should end with the hope for the future
  • It needs to include a salutation, and an ending. Dear…and Sincerely…

With the criteria the students identify, how good is the mouse’s apology?

For 10 creative writing ideas, click Mr. Maxwell’s Mouse to download.

School For Bandits

School_For_Bandits_PB_CoverRalph Raccoon is too polite and too nice. His parents have to send him to Bandit School to learn to be a proper bad raccoon. How does Ralph use his “niceness” to succeed?

Hannah Shaw, Alfred A. Knopf, ©2011, 978-0-375-96768-9

Synonym Study

There are many synonyms for people who take things that don’t belong to them. Students might find: pirate, thief, robber, buccaneer, brigand, cheat, crook, con artist, rustler, looter, pilfereer, shoplifter, gangster, highwayman, raider, racketeer, etc. This could also be a good brainstorming activity to build vocabulary.

Once they have a list, ask them to define each one in such a way that people could read the list of definitions and know what each word was being referred to.

School-For-Bandits-bad-listThe Being Bad Alphabet

Ralph Raccoon hasn’t been bad enough so he has to brainstorm 26 words (one for each letter of the alphabet) that are ways of being bad. A could be for aggravating, B for bragging, C for cursing, and so on. X and Z are notoriously hard—encourage students to use two words if necessary to get them in. Examples: eXtra Noisy or Zealously irritating.

This can be an individual activity or a brainstorming activity to build vocabulary.

For 6 creative writing ideas, click School For Bandits to download.