The Qultimaker’s Gift

QuiltmakersGiftThis book is not new, but has been recently re-issued, so I am including it because it is great for writing ideas. The Quiltmaker makes quilts only for the poor. When the king covets one she refuses, but will make one square for each gift he gives away. After several threats, he gives in, and finds that giving to others is where he find happiness.

Jeff Brumbeau, Scholastic, ©2001, ISBN 0-439-30910-7

The Pattern Story

The quilting patterns shown on the 32 pages of the book have been chosen to echo the part of story told on each page. Give each student a page and a copy of the patterns in the book (on the inside covers.) First they find their pattern, and its name. Then they develop an explanation of why that pattern has been chosen for that page. Create a quick PowerPoint showing each of pages and a close-up of each of the patterns in order. Finally, you read the story (or students read the story), page by page. As each page is read, show the pattern. At the end of that page, a student explains the pattern and why he/she feels it was chosen for the page. There are 23 patterns in total, so some of the students will need to “double up” if you have a larger class. (The key to the match of the pattern to the page is included in the PDF you can download for this book.)

Vocabulary of Shimmer

In describing the king’s storehouse of gifts, the author says they “shimmer”. Ask students to brainstorm words that mean to reflect or give off light. Some words they may come up with are: shimmer, glitter, sparkle, glow, flash, shine, twinkle, scintillate, radiate, dazzle, glint, glisten, beam, emit, gleam, glare, etc. Give students a pair of words and ask them to tell you the difference—ie. shimmer vs glare or twinkle vs. gleam. Then ask them to arrange the words from least amount of light to most amount of light. In general, playing with the words solidifies the vocabulary.

For 10 creative writing ideas, click The Quilt Maker’s Gift to download.

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Miss Hunnicutt’s Hat

61VXWEWPH0LThe Queen is coming to Littleton and Miss Hunnicutt wants to wear her hat with a chicken on top. After she stands up for her right to wear what she wants, we discover that the Queen loves her hat with the turkey on top.

Jeff Brumbeau, Orchard Books/ Scholastic, ©2003, ISBN 0-439-31895-5

The Art of Hats

Many famous pieces of art involve women wearing hats. Attached are a couple of pages of samples of such pieces of art, with their name, and the artist.

hatsinartAsk students to choose one to research (in pairs). The team needs to produce 12 facts about the artist, and 6 facts about the painting (where it is located, size, and, the model, the hat, etc.)

Depending on the time you have students may:

  • Report on an 8.5 X 11 poster with the picture and their information
  • Report orally (2 minutes. 1 minute each) as you show the images on a screen.
  • Create a scavenger hunt to expose them to at least 5 of the poster reports.

Follow the Pattern

Students can incorporate their own pattern into a story that they create. Each time Miss Hunnicutt is asked to take off her hat she replies:

  1. I will not.
  2. I have a right to wear what I like.
  3. I won’t wear a (flounder) and I won’t wear (an orangutan).
  4. But I will wear (a chicken) and I will wear it on my head.

 

Student patterns can be either about wearing something, or can be about something they commonly do, such as ride a bicycle.

  1. I will not.
  2. I have a right to ride a bicycle.
  3. I won’t ride in the ditch, and I won’t ride in the store.
  4. But I will ride in the bike lane, and I’ll do it in the morning.

 

For 10 creative writing ideas, click Miss Hunnicut’s Hat to download.